Fat Quarter Gang

Fat Quarter Gang - Prism Jumbo Floor Pillow by Freshly Pieced

IMG_1669

Hi everyone, it's Lee again from Freshly Pieced, back with another tutorial for you all—this time I'm showing you how to make this giant "Prism" Floor Pillow in Art Gallery's fun new Carnaby Street line.

You will need:
-12 fat quarters of Art Gallery's Carnaby Street line
- 3/8 yard solid background fabric
- 3/4 yard for pillow back
- 26" square piece of muslin for pillow lining
- 26" piece of batting
- 24" pillow form

IMG_1634
From the Carnaby Street prints, cut:
- 4 squares 2" x 2", cut in half diagonally to make 8 triangles (you will use 4 of these triangles)
- 8 squares 3" x 3", cut in half diagonally to make 16 triangles (you will use 8 of these triangles)
- 12 squares 4" x 4", cut in half diagonally to make 24 triangles (you will use 12 of these triangles)
- 12 squares 7" x 7", cut in half diagonally to make 24 triangles (you will use 12 of these triangles)
Save your remaining scrap triangles for other projects!

IMG_1633

From the solid background fabric, cut:
- 2 squares 2" x 2", cut in half diagonally to make 4 triangles

- 4 squares 3" x 3", cut in half diagonally to make 8 triangles
- 6 squares 4" x 4", cut in half diagonally to make 12 triangles
- 6 squares 7" x 7", cut in half diagonally to make 12 triangles

From the fabric for the pillow back, cut:
- 1 piece 12" x 24 1/2"
- 1 piece 18" x 24 1/2"

To make the pillow:

  IMG_1677

1. Pair up each solid background triangle (I used white) with a print triangle. Sew 1/4" from the long edge. Make the following units:

2" triangles - make 4 units
3" triangles - make 8 units
4" triangles - make 12 units
7" triangles - make 12 units

IMG_1679

3. Square up the units using a ruler with a 45-degree angle. Line up the marked 45-degree line on the ruler with the HST seam. Square up to the following measurements:

2" triangle units = square up to 1 1/2"
3" triangle units = square up to 2 1/2"
4" triangle units = square up to 3 1/2"
7" triangle units = square up to 6 1/2"

Screen Shot 2013-03-10 at 10.47.39 PM
4. Lay out your finished HST units as shown in the diagram above. The smallest 1 1/2" HST units are laid out in the center, in two rows of 2. The 2 1/2" HST units surround the 1 1/2" units. The 3 1/2" units surround that, and the 6 1/2" units surround that.

Screen Shot 2013-03-10 at 10.53.48 PM
5. Join the 1 1/2" HST units into two rows of two, then join the two rows together to make a 2 1/2" finished block.

Screen Shot 2013-03-10 at 11.02.19 PM
6. Join the 2 1/2" HST units together as shown, with the smaller pieced units at the center.

Screen Shot 2013-03-10 at 11.10.30 PM
7. Join the 3 1/2" HST units together in sets of two, as shown, and join to each side of the center unit.

Screen Shot 2013-03-10 at 11.15.11 PM

8. Join the remaining 3 1/2" HST units together in two rows of 4 units each, and join to the top and bottom of the center unit.

Screen Shot 2013-03-10 at 11.21.57 PM

9. Repeat steps 7 and 8 using 6 1/2" HST units to complete the pillow top.

IMG_1674

10. Layer the pillow top with the batting piece and muslin backing. Quilt the top however you would like—I quilted in straight diagonal lines.

IMG_1637

11. To make the pillow back, take the two pillow back pieces (12" x 24 1/2" and 18" x 24 1/2"). On each piece, fold one of the 24 1/2" edges down 1/2" and press. Fold down 1/2" again and press. Sew the hem 3/8" from the folded edge.

IMG_1640
12. To make the pillow trim, cut 2 1/2" wide strips of fabric from the leftover Carnaby Street prints.  (I used strips from several of the darker Carnaby Street prints.) Sew the strips together end-to-end until the strip measures about 120" long. Press the entire strip in half lengthwise, as shown.

IMG_1639

13. To sew the pillow together, place the quilted pillow top with the wrong side facing up. Lay the first pillow back piece onto the quilted top, aligned with the bottom edge. Lay the second pillow back piece onto the quilted top, aligned with the top edge. Pin in a few spots around the edges. (Yes, this pillow is assembled right side out and will not need turning—the pillow trim we'll add in the next step will enclose the seam allowances.)

IMG_1646
14. Now flip the whole thing over and add the pillow trim you made in step 12. This step is done exactly like quilt binding—lay out the binding around the perimeter of the pillow top, mitering the corners. Remove the pins you added in the previous step and repin everything (pillow trim, pillow cover, and pillow back pieces). Sew around the perimeter of the pillow using your favorite quilt-binding method.

IMG_1656

15. Fold the binding around to the back of the pillow, just as you would do with quilt binding, and stitch down onto the back of the pillow using your favorite machine-binding method.

Here's a great machine-binding tutorial by Allison of Cluck Cluck Sew. You can also hand-stitch the trim to the back of the pillow if you prefer.

IMG_1660
Now just insert your pillow form and you're ready to enjoy this jumbo-size pillow. It finishes at 24" square (and requires a 24" pillow form). Hope you liked our project today—stop by my blog, Freshly Pieced, for more tutorials and patterns.

Want to win your own fat quarter bundle? Well, hop on over to my blog and
leave a comment for a chance to win. Giveaway open until March 15th.

As always, to be eligible to win, you must follow us on your fav social media
platform. (Pinterest, Facebook, Twitter) AND subscribe to our blog to stay up to
date on all things AGF & the Fat Quarter Gang!

Ohhh... and let's not forget Flickr!

See ya next week,

<3 Your AGF team

 


Fat Quarter Gang - Quilted Heating Pad by PS I Quilt

  FatQuarterGANG_banner400pxBLUEHey y'all. Rachel here from PS I Quilt. Today I'm gonna show y'all how to make a quilted heating pad. These things are a godsend. You definitely need one (or three) of these in your life.  Trust me. My fabrics of choice are these lovelies ...
FQG - tut 4 - title

What y'all will need:

  • 8 print fat quarters
  • 1 solid fat quarter
  • Fusible Fleece
  • 1 pound bag of rice
  • Essential oil (optional)

FQG - tut 4 - fabrics
From each print fat quarter, cut: 1 strip, 2 1/2" x 5 1/2"

From print fat quarter, cut: 1 strip, 6 1/2" x 10 1/2" 1 strip, 7 1/2" x 10 1/2"

From solid fat quarter cut:

2 strips, 8" x 10"

FQG - tut 4 - pic 1

Lay out 2 1/2" x 5 1/2" strips in a manner that is pleasing to you.

FQG - tut 4 - pic 2
Working in pairs, piece your strips along the long sides using 1/4" seam allowance. You should have 4 strip sets.

FQG - tut 4 - pic 3
Join 2 strip sets together to make 2 units.

FQG - tut 4 - pic 5
Join 2 units together to make a quilt top.

FQG - tut 4 - pic 6
Layer quilt top with fusible fleece. Cut to size. Fuse. Quilt as desired.

FQG - tut 4 - pic 7
I did some easy peasy straight line quilting. Go on. You can do it, too.

FQG - tut 4 - pic 8
Now we're going to make an envelope backing for your heating pad using our two 8" x 10" strips.

FQG - tut 4 - pic 9
Take and fold about a 1/4" fold along the long side. Press.

FQG - tut 4 - pic 10

Fold that fold over another 1/4" to create a hem. Press. Repeat the hemming process for the other 8" x 10" strip.

FQG - tut 4 - pic 12
Stitch both hems. And now your backing is made. Yayyy.

FQG - tut 4 - pic 13
We're going to make a mini quilt sandwhich.

Lay quilted top down with the right side facing up. Layer with one hemmed rectangle, right sides together.

FQG - tut 4 - pic 14
Layer the second hemmed rectangle on the quilted top, right sides together

FQG - tut 4 - pic 15
Pin.

Note: The hems of the rectangles are supposed to overlap each other. Using a 1/4" seam allowance, stitch around all four sides of heating pad.

FQG - tut 4 - pic 17
Clip corners.

FQG - tut 4 - pic 18
Turn right side out. Set aside.

FQG - tut 4 - pic 19
Layer both 8" x 10" solid strips together. Sew around all four sides, leaving a 4" opening.

FQG - tut 4 - pic 20
Clip corners. Turn right sides out. Fill with rice. Add a few drops of essential oil. (I like eucalyptus or lavender.)

Note: Depending on how pliable you'd like your heating pad, you can add up to 1 more pound of rice.

Machine stitch opening. (No one will see this but you.)

FQG - tut 4 - pic 22
Insert rice bag.

FQG - tut 4 - pic 23
And you're done.

FQG - tut 4 - pic 24
Give yourself a pat on the back. These are SO quick to whip up, y'all can easily make these for you, your quilty friend &/or your manicurist.

Want to win your own fat quarter bundle? Well, hop on over to my blog and leave a comment for a chance to win.

Hope y'all enjoy.

Rachel Griffith, www.psiquilt.com

As always, to be eligible to win, you must follow us on your fav social media platform. (Pinterest, Facebook, Twitter) AND subscribe to our blog to stay up to date on all things AGF & the Fat Quarter Gang!

Ohhh... and let's not forget Flickr! Giveaway open until March 8th.

 

See ya next week,

<3 Your AGF team


Fat Quarter Gang - Divided Organizer Bucket by The Busy Bean

BusyBeanCarBucket
I drive a minivan without any storage in between the seats. It drives me crazy. I've been using an old shipping box that was convenient to grab before a road trip, but I knew I had to class it up a little. Enter Jeni Baker's great new line, Color Me Retro.

BusyBeanCarBucket12

Here's what you'll need:

  • 6 Fat Quarters (2) outside (2) lining (1) for the divider (1) for the garbage bin
  • 2.5 yards Shape Flex (SF-101) fusible interfacing
  • basic sewing tools - sewing machine, thread, scissors

A few notes before we start. All seams are 1/4" unless otherwise specified. Also, in some of the pictures I have used red lines to indicate where to sew, or where your stitching lines are, so that they are clear to you.

1. Start by cutting your fabric. From outside fabric cut (2) pieces 16" x 21" From lining fabric cut (2) pieces 16" x 21.5" From divider fabric cut (2) pieces 10" x 10" From garbage bin fabric cut (4) pieces 12" x 10" Cut a coordinating piece of interfacing for each piece of fabric

BusyBeanCarBucket1
2. Fuse the coordinating interfacing piece to the wrong side of each fabric piece.

3. Sew the divider together. Line the two pieces up,right sides facing. Sew along two opposite edges (shown with red lines). Turn it right side out and topstitch along the edges you just sewed. Set aside.

BusyBeanCarBucket2
4. Sew your outside pieces together along the two short sides and one long side (bottom). Set aside. Repeat with the lining piece.

5. Now we're going to cut the lining piece down the center to let us put the divider in.Take it to your cutting mat and make one vertical cut 11.5" from one side. (It's off center, I know, but I did this so a tissue box will fit snugly inside and not wobble around.) The red lines in the picture indicate the sides you've sewn together.

BusyBeanCarBucket3

6. Grab one half of the lining you just cut. Open up the lining so the bottom seam is laying flat and make a mark 4.75" from the center seam, close to the cut edge. Make a mark 4.75" on the other side of center seam.

BusyBeanCarBucket4
7. Now grab your divider and line up one of the finished edges with that mark, letting the raw edge overhang your lining piece by 1/2 inch. Sew the divider to the lining along the cut edge, 1/4" away from the cut edge of your lining.

BusyBeanCarBucket5
Sew the other side of the divider to the opposite side of the lining piece in the same manner. When you're done it should look like this.

BusyBeanCarBucket6
8. Grab the other half of your cut lining piece. Right sides facing, line up the bottom seam of both pieces, match the tops, and pin (or clip) in place. Sew the two halves together along the edge you cut, with your divider piece sandwiched between.

BusyBeanCarBucket7
9. Now it's time to box the corners. Form a triangle with one corner of your lining piece by pinching the sides together and matching the side seam with the bottom seam. Grab a ruler and draw a line 9" long (this will be 4.5" up from the corner point). Keeping your corner lined up this way, sew over the line you just drew. Repeat for the other corner of the lining. Then grab the outside piece you set aside earlier and do the same thing with the bottom two corners. Cut away the excess fabric between the line you have just sewn and the corner, 1/4" away from the sewn line.

BusyBeanCarBucket8
(Not pictured, but I used those scraps I cut off the corners to make two tabs for the top of my bucket. If you want tabs, just grab one of those corners, separate the two pieces, fold each piece in half, then fold the edges in to meet the center line, sew along the edge, and use it as a tab.)

10. Grab your seam ripper and remove about 4" from the bottom seam in your outside piece. (Some people prefer to leave this open at the beginning, but I think it's easier to box the corners when the seam is completely finished.) With your outside piece inside out, match the right sides of your outside and lining pieces, making sure the side seams line up. Pin or clip all around the top edge. Just shove as much of the outside piece into the lining piece as you can. It won't go all the way down because of your divider, but trust me, you've got plenty of room to sew it up. Sew all around the top using a 1/2" seam allowance.

BusyBeanCarBucket9

11. Turn the bucket right side out through the hole in the bottom of the outside piece. Sew the hole closed by hand. (It'll look best sewn by hand, but I'm super lazy and I just did it with my machine, since it's the bottom of a bucket for my car, and nobody's ever going to see it. Just keeping it real.) Topstitch around the top of your bucket.

12. We're nearing the end now. We're going to add pin-tucks to the corners to square it up nicely and help it stand up on its own. Grab a ruler and measure 4.5" from the side seams along the top edge of your bucket. Using an erasable pen, make a mark on each side of both seams. Pinch the fabric together with that mark between your fingers. Grab the bottom corner of your bucket and make a crease along the line between these two points. Sew 1/8" from the edge, creating a pin-tuck and catching the lining fabric.

BusyBeanCarBucket10
You could be done here, but I wanted a separate garbage bin. This is so easy now that you've made a big bucket. You're going to follow all the steps for assembling the large bucket, without the fussy divider.

Grab your four pieces you cut and start with step 4 above, only this time sew the two long edges and only one short edge. Skip to step 9, and when you make the corner gussets, your line will be 4.5" long. Then you just finish with steps 10-12 as written.

BusyBeanCarBucket11
There you have it! On one side of the divider you can keep the garbage bin and a tissue box nice and handy. The other side can contain all those little things that end up in the car and have nowhere to go. Or, this makes a nice size bucket for sitting on a bookshelf to hide away necessary but unsightly items (like all those controllers for video games).

BusyBeanCarBucket14

Thanks for having me AGF! If you want to win your own stack of Color Me Retro fat quarters, head on over to my blog and leave a comment on the Color Me Retro post. Giveaway will be open until Friday, March 1st.

As always to be eligible to win you must follow us on your fav social media platform (Pinterest, Facebook, Twitter)and Subscribe to our blog to stay up to date on all things AGF & the Fat Quarter Gang!

And don't forget to add any projects you made from this (and the other fabulous Art Gallery Fat Quarter Gang tutes) to the flickr group!

Til next time.. Happy Sewing

Colleen & The Fat Quarter Gang


Fat Quarter Gang - Color Me Retro Mini Quilt by Diary of a Quilter

FatQuarterGANG_banner400pxBLUE
Hello fellow Art Gallery Fabric lovers! I'm Amy Smart from Diary of a Quilter and today I am sharing a quick little table topper project using one of my new, favorite collections, Color Me Retro by Jeni Baker.

I have been collecting vintage pyrex and other dishes for a while now so when I heard Jeni was designing a vintage-dishware-inspired fabric collection, I knew I would love it! And I was right.

Playing with this fabric made me so in the mood for spring! I'm glad I have some cheerful color on my table to keep my hopes up. Here are the fabric requirements for this 24" x 24" square table topper. (The same yardage will work for a 12" x 48" table runner.)

  •  10 Fat Quarters from Color Me Retro collection (I used all 10 because I wanted to feature the entire collection, but you really only need 4 fat quarters worth of yardage for this project.)
  • 5/8 yard solid turquoise. (The coordinating Pure Element is Fresh Water)

This project consists of one simple 6" pinwheel-type block. Each block requires 2 strips 2" x 14.5". I used the same solid as one of the strips in each block, but you could use a variety of fabrics if you like.
Sew strips together and press toward the print fabric. Carefully sub-cut into 4 units 3 1/2" square. 
 Rotate the units as pictured.
Sew units into two rows as pictured, pressing seams toward the print. Then sew two rows together to create a 6 1/2" (unfinished) block.
After center seam is sewn, "pop" the seam in the center of the block (un-pick a couple of the stitches). 
Press each seam (from assembling the 4 units) toward the print strip in a counter-clockwise direction. This will help seams match up when you go to sew your block together.
Create 15 more blocks. 

I sewed my blocks 4 across by 4 down to create a 24" x 24" square. You could also sew them 8 across by 2 down to create a 12" x 48" table runner.

I then used my remaining fat quarter prints to piece together a quilt back 27" x 27". (You could also use 3/4 yard of fabric for this backing.) I like that I can have a reversible option for my table.

From there layer the top, batting and quilt back and quilt as desired. I used my walking foot to sew quilting lines 3/4" apart. When quilting is finished, trim excess batting and backing fabric so that edges are clean and square.

For the binding, cut 3 strips 2 1/2" wide from your remaining solid and sew them together end to end. Here is a binding tutorial if you need one.

And that's it! This is a quick pinwheel-type block if you want to make lots of blocks and create a bigger version of this look too.

Thanks for having me AGF! Don't forget! If you want to win your own stack of Color Me Retro fat quarters, visit my blog, Diary of a Quilter, and leave a comment on the Color Me Retro post. Giveaway will be open until Friday, February 22.

As always to be eligible to win you must follow us on your fav social media platform (Pinterest, Facebook, Twitter)and Subscribe to our blog to stay up to date on all things AGF & the Fat Quarter Gang!

And don't forget to add any projects you made from this (and the other fabulous Art Gallery Fat Quarter Gang tutes) to the flickr group!

Til next time.. Happy Sewing

Amy & The Fat Quarter Gang


Fat Quarter Gang - Boucherouite Blush Box by i heart linen

image from iheartlinen.typepad.com

Hi everyone!  Rashida Coleman-Hale here again with my third tutorial!  Yay!  Did you miss me?  Of COURSE you did! 

So.....can I just say that I fell in love with Sarah Watson's booth when I was at Quilt Market last season.  It was so awesome and her collections are SO stunning, and she was equally as awesome and okay, maybe I should just start my own 'Sarah Watson Fan Club'!  Hee!  

Well, I knew right away what I would make if I got my little sew mits on some of her fabric.  Boxes for my studio!  Duh!  These are super easy to make and you can easily adapt the instructions to make a round box of any size you like.  So, here's how you make one for your makery pleasure. Enjoy!

FQG_Box

Finished Size: 4" x 5 1/2" 

  LIB-quartz

SUPPLIES

  • 2 gorgeous fat quarters from Art Gallery Fabrics 
  • Cardboard
  • Cardstock
  • Masking Tape
  • Glue and a paint brush OR Spray Adhesive
  • Batting
  • Scissors
  • Rotary Cutter
  • Cutting Mat
  • Acrylic Ruler
  • X-Acto Knife
  • Circle Template

 

CUTTING

Cardstock - Cut three 5" circles 

Cut one 2 3/4" x 16 1/4" rectangle 

Cut one 1" x 16 3/4" rectangle 

 

Cardboard - Cut two 5" cirlces 

Cut one 2 1/2" x 16 3/4" rectangle

Cut one 1" x 16 3/4" rectangle 

 

Outer Fabric - Cut two circles using template and add 1/2" allowance around to make 6" circles

Cut one 4" x 18 1/2" rectangle 

Cut one 2 1/2" x 18 1/2" rectangle

 

Inner Fabric - Cut two circles using template and add 1/2" allowance around to make 6" circles

Cut one 4" x 18 1/2" rectangle 

 

Batting - Cut four 5" circles 

 

INSTRUCTIONS 

Before you start I just want to mention that I used spray adhesive for this project because it was fast and dried quickly.  If you use this method, PLEASE make sure you're in a very well ventilated area.  If you're not a fan of this stuff, you can easily do this project with good old Elmer's glue and a paint brush.  Just paint glue on the sections where I state that you should spray the adhesive.  You'll have to take some time between steps to let some things dry, but the results are just as lovely.  Also, your hands won't be all stick and gross.  (Olive oil got the glue off my fingers lickety split, btw.) 

1

Take the card board rectangles and from a loop with the edges meeeting end to end.  Use the masking tape to tape the ends together forming two circles.  (I'm pretty sure I measured correctly, but to be sure make sure to wrap the cardboard rectangles around the cardboard circles to be sure they fit perfectly.  You can easily trim the ends if necessary and this will avoid any headache after you've taped the ends together.)
2

Box_LidTapeTop

Press the circles inside the cardboard loops.  Tape around one edge with masking tape.

3
3

Clip the tape around the perimiter of the box.  Then carefully press the tape onto the top forming the llid of the box.  Repeat this process with the other circle and bookboard piece to form the box bottom. 

 

Box_PancakeBatting

Take the batting and stack them on top of your newly formed lid.  

Box_CoverBatting

Flip it upside down on top of one of the fabric cirlces you've cut out for the lid.  Clip around the perimeter of the fabric. 

Box_CoverTop

Spray the outer edge of the cardboard with adhesive and press the fabric down around the edges of the lid. 
Box_MakeLidEdge

Next take one of the 4" x 18 1/2" rectangles and place it in front of you wrong side up.  Place the 1" x 16 3/4" cardstock on top about 1/2" down from the top.   Fold that allowance over and press with an warm iron.  Clip the bottom edges.

Box_WrapEdgeLid
Spray the outer edge of the lid once more and wrap the outer fabric with the cardstock around the lid.

Fold in the edges and overlap the ends. 


Box_CoverBatting

Next spray the inside of the lid and wrap the fabric over the edges and press down inside the the lid. 

Box_CoverCardstockCircles

Now take the two inner fabric circles and two cardstock circles.  Adhere the cardstock to the wrong side of the circles.  Clip around the edges.  Set one aside. 

Box_CoverBatting

With the remaining circle, spray the wrong side with adhesive and then fold the clipped edges in.


Box_CoverBatting
Spray the inside of the lid lightly with adhesive and press the circle wrong sides together onto the inside of the lid.  Your lid is finished! Yay! 

Box_WrapFabricOutside

Now take the bottom of the box and spray the outside with adhesive.  Wrap the outer fabric around the box leaving about 1/2" of allowance on either side.  Fold the raw edge over on the end and overlap the ends.  Clip around the perimeter of the allowance on both sides. 

Box_WrapFabricBottom

Next, spray the bottom of the box and press the clipped edges down. 


Box_WrapFabricBottom

Repeat this with the top edges. 

Box_InsertInnerBottom

Spray the inside of the box and press the remaining inner circle into the box.  Be sure to let the allowance remain visible and free as you press the circle down. 

Box_FoldFabricOver1

Take the remaining inner fabric rectangle and place it in front of you wrong side up.  Center and adhere the remaining cardstock rectangle to the fabric. 


Box_FoldFabricOver

Fold the allowance in to make nice clean edges. 


Box_InsertSides

Once again with the spray!   Spray the inside of the box then press the rectangle to the inside

FQG_Box

Assemble the bottom of the box with the outer fabric circle and cardstock in the same manner as you did with the inside of the lid.  Spray the bottom of the box and press the bottom on. 

FQG_Box

Voila!  Box! ^_^ 

Want to get YOUR mits on this Fat Quarter bundle? Well simple, hop on over to my blog and leave me a comment answering my buring question... "Working on any projects for your workspace?  Do tell! "

As always to be eligible to win you must follow us on your fav social media platform (Pinterest, Facebook, Twitter)and Subscribe to our blog to stay up to date on all things AGF & the Fat Quarter Gang!

And don't forget to add any projects you made from this (and the other fabulous Art Gallery Fat Quarter Gang tutes) to the flickr group!

Til next time.. Happy Sewing

<3,

Rashida & The Fat Quarter Gang


Fat Quarter Gang - Lap of Luxe by Quilt Dad

FatQuarterGANG_banner400pxBLUE

Hey guys, John here from the Quilt Dad blog. I was originally going to make a small project with my lovely new stack of Luxe fat quarters, but once I started cutting into the prints I couldn't help but make a whole quilt! 

  _DSC0005_text
I wanted to make something fairly simple and with large blocks to show off the beautiful prints.  Although the prints are quite sophisticated in nature, I think this small quilt would be just as appropriate for a baby or child as it would be on the back of your couch.

_DSC0004

Finished block size: 13” (13.5” unfinished)

Finished quilt size: 52” x 65”

LIB-greystone3

Materials needed

  • 10 fat quarters of Luxe In Bloom by Art Gallery Fabrics
  • 1 ¾ yards of a background fabric.  I used a combination of Mystic Grey and Light Grey from Art Gallery Fabrics' Pure Elements collection of solids.
  • 4 yards of a backing fabric
  • 2/3 yard of a binding fabric

Download Lap of luxe quilt pattern (updated)

_DSC0003
If you make a Lap of Luxe quilt, I'd love to see it!  Please add it to the Quilt Dad is my Homeboy Flickr group.

If you'd like to win this beautiful stash of fat quarters then hop on over to John's blog, Quilt Dad and let him know what you are looking forward to this month.

As always to be eligible to win you must follow us on your fav social media platform (Pinterest, Facebook, Twitter)and Subscribe to our blog to stay up to date on all things AGF & the Fat Quarter Gang!

And don't forget to add any projects you made from this (and the other fabulous Art Gallery Fat Quarter Gang tutes) to the flickr group!

Til next time.. Happy Sewing

<3,

John & The Fat Quarter Gang

 


Fat Quarter Gang - HST Zipper Pouch & Key Fob by In Color Order

FatQuarterGANG_banner400pxBLUE

Hi! It’s Jeni, from In Color Order, sharing my latest tutorial for the Fat Quarter Gang! Today we’re going to make some more accessories for your purse, a HST Zipper Pouch and Key FOBs!

Main

I love keeping a roomy zipper pouch in my purse to keep some lotion, lip balm, a nail file or two, and a bit of emergency candy. This pouch is the perfect size for all those little things that end up at the bottom of your bag!

While we’re at it, how about a new key FOB? We’ll make two different versions, one plain and one patchwork. Makes it easier to find your keys, plus they’re just pretty!

The pouch features half-square triangles (HST), which we’ll cover, so never fear if you haven’t made them before!

Materials:
IMG_5729

- 8 print fat quarters: Azalea (Living Elements), Stardust Dawn (Rock ‘n Romance),Flumes Citron (Luxe in Bloom), Chartreuse (Oval Elements), Extravagarden Bold (Luxe in Bloom), Floralism Deep Sea (Modernology), Stardust Twilight (Rock ‘n Romance), Silver Drops (Oval Elements.)

IMG_5765

 - 8” (or larger) zipper

- 1/2 yard of 3/4” twill tape

- 1/3 yard lightweight fusible interfacing

- 1/4 yard fusible fleece

- (2) 1.25” metal key FOB hardware

- Coordinating thread

Note: 1/4” seam allowance unless otherwise noted.

Click here to download the full HST Zipper Pouch + Key FOBs pdf.

IMG_5977
If you'd like to win some this beautiful stash of fat quarters then hop on over to Jeni's blog, In Color Order and let her know. While you're there, sit back and keep warm with a cup of coffee and take a peek at all of her other inspiring posts :) 

As always to be eligible to win you must follow us on your fav social media platform (Pinterest, Facebook, Twitter)and Subscribe to our blog to stay up to date on all things AGF & the Fat Quarter Gang!

And don't forget to add any projects you made from this (and the other fabulous Art Gallery Fat Quarter Gang tutes) to the flickr group!

Til next time.. Happy Sewing

<3,

Jeni & The Fat Quarter Gang


Fat Quarter Gang - Shades of Love by During Quiet Time

FatQuarterGANG_banner400pxBLUE
Hello Friends,

Amy from During Quiet Time here and today I am sharing my third tutorial as a member of the Art Gallery Fabrics Fat Quarter Gang!  Due to the fact that Valentine's Day is quickly approaching, I chose a selection of Pure Elements, Lace Elements and Living Elements blenders to make a Valentine's Day table runner.

IMGP3308a
It's all hearts, of course, but I love that they don't jump right out at you due to the strong secondary design. For this project I used a mixture of blenders. The finished runner measures 24" x 36.".

Dowload PDF pattern Download Shades of Love Table Runner

IMGP3291a 

Well now to what you will need..

Fabric Requirements:

FQ: Living Elements Strawberry Cream

FQ: Living Elements Red Ribbon

FQ: Living Elements Azalea

FQ: Lace Elements Pink Lace

FQ: Lace Elements Cherry Lace

FQ: Lace Elements Pearl Lace

FQ: Pure Elements White Linen

1/4 yard: Pure Elements Cherry Lipgloss (reserve for binding)

Dimensions:  The runner measures 24" x 36" finished.

IMGP3306a

If you'd like to win some of the awesome blenders to add to your stash head on over to my blog - www.duringquiettime.blogspot.com  and leave a comment to enter to win.  

As always to be eligible to win you must follow us on your fav social media platform (Pinterest, Facebook, Twitter)and Subscribe to our blog to stay up to date on all things AGF & the Fat Quarter Gang!

And don't forget to add any projects you made from this (and the other fabulous Art Gallery Fat Quarter Gang tutes) to the flickr group!

Til next time.. Happy Sewing

<3,

Amy Friend & The Fat Quarter Gang


Fat Quarter Gang - Chevron Valance by Maureen Cracknell Handmade

FatQuarterGANG_banner400pxBLUE
Happy Monday! It's Maureen here again from Maureen Cracknell Handmade! I'm so excited to be sharing my newest Fat Quarter Gang Project with you all today! This time I'm sharing a tutorial for making this pretty Luxe In Bloom Chevron Valance.
ChevronValance_cover
We just moved into our very first home, so I am all about sewing up home decor these days! Now let's get started!!

Valance for Anais -- dark

What you'll need :
  • 6 - fat quarters of Sarah Watson's gorgeous Luxe In Bloom
  • Coordinating Thread
  • Rotary Cutter/Mat/Ruler measuring 6" in width
  • Spring Tension Curtain Rod

* Note *   - This tutorial will make two - 24" valances from Six Fat Quarters. For a Valance measuring 36", at step #15 simply add an 8" x 22" piece of fabric to each side, instead of 2" x 22".  

Cutting and Piecing the Fabrics : : 

Gorgeous Luxe in Bloom

1. Using five of the six prints and a rotary cutter, quilting ruler, and cutting mat, cut two strips from each fabric measuring 3" x 22" 

2.  Using a 1/2" seam allowance, sew these strips together to make two rectangles measuring 11" x 22" 

3. Press well with all seams open

0. fabrics for patchwork
Step 1

Cutting on the Diagonal : :

4. Working with one of the pieces of striped fabrics, place your cutting ruler over your work at an angle positioned from the top left corner running 4" out from the bottom of the fabrics (pic 1) and trim away (pic 2) 

5. Without moving the ruler and using the 6"width of the ruler, trim away the fabric on the opposite side (pic 3) 

6. Keeping that angle trim away a second piece (pic 4)

Step 2

7. Square up these two pieces to measure 6" x 11.5"

7. trim away, to rectangle measureing

8. Repeat these steps with the second piece of striped fabrics, but this time trim from the top right side at an angle leading out to 4" at the bottom

8. repeat, but this time trim from left side, add angle leading to 4 inches at the bottom

9. Continue following the same steps until you have two pieces cut to measure 6" x 11.5" from this side. You'll have four pieces total now, two with a diagonal running down from the left and two from the right

9. repeat so you have two of each

Piecing the Chevron : : 

10. Using one of each angled piece of fabric, place with right sides together (pic 1)  Pin, sew, and press seams open (pic 2) to create one chevron piece 

11. Repeat this with the remaining two angled pieces (pic 3) 

12. Sew those two chevron pieces together (pic 4)

step 3

Adding the Border Fabrics : :

13. Using the final, sixth fat quarter, cut one piece measuring 4" x 22" and one piece measuring 5" x 22"

14. cut border fabrics

14. Add the 5" piece to the top of your chevron fabric piece and the 4" piece to the bottom. Trim to measure one 18" x 22" piece

15. add border fabrics, if you can center them

15. Cut two 2" x 22" (for a 24" valance or two 8" x 22" for a 36" valance) Pin and sew those to each side of your work, pressing seams open

16. cut 2 inch strips for the sides or 8 inch for a larger valance

Hemming and Finishing : :

16. Hem all four sides, beginning with the top and bottom first, by folding each edge in 1/4", pressing, folding over 1/4" again, pinning and sewing along the inner folded edges

17. hem all four sides, beginning with the top and bottom

17. Once the hemming is finished, with the wrong side of your work facing up, fold the top edge down 2" and press (pic 1).  Pin this fold in place and sew along the bottom edge (pic 2) and top edge (pic 3)

18. to make rod pocket, fold down 2 inches, press, and pin
last step

18.  Add your Spring Tension Curtain Rod and pick your window!

These were made for our kitchen windows and we love them! From morning until dusk the light gleams thru like beautiful stained glass, illuminating Sarah's gorgeous designs! And, in the evening the lovely colors that make up this fabric collection really shine!

IMG_0374_

Feel free to share on my Facebook page or in my Maureen Cracknell Handmade Flickr group too! 

Maureen

As always to be eligible to win you must follow us on your fav social media platform (Pinterest, Facebook, Twitter)and Subscribe to our blog to stay up to date on all things AGF & the Fat Quarter Gang! Ohhh... and lets not forget Flickr!

Enjoy and happy sewing!

 


Fat Quarter Gang - "I Just Want Your Kiss" clasp purse by I'm A Ginger Monkey

FatQuarterGANG_banner400pxBLUE

Hi! It's Katy here from I'm A GingerMonkey. I hope you all had a wonderful holiday season and that you are ready and raring to make 2013 the best year ever. I'm sure you must all be rested and desperate for a quick project, right?

Clasp_cover

Today I'm going to show you how to make a metal frame purse. I chose to use Pat Bravo's Rock n Romance for my project. I absolutely love how the colours in this collection are a mix of grungey grays and purple and super feminine peaches. It's such a juxtaposition of colours and prints, and perfect for any fashion conscious diva. (hey - that sounds like Pat!)

You will need:

6" x 3" metal purse frame (I buy mine from here)

Strong fabric glue (I like to use gutermann HT2, it really is the best ever - but if you  can't find it locally something like UHU works well. You can buy HT2 online from here)

2 FQs of fabric - one for lining and one for the purse body (I used Rock n Romance by Pat Bravo)

FQ of lightweight batting

piping cord
something pointy like a skewer or some scissors (it will get gluey so don't use anything precious)

Print the purse template and cut it out (download here). It prints upside down - because I forgot to spin it when I was uploading. Oops - so the widest point (with the arrows going across) is the bottom.

Step 1

Cut out the template and press your fabrics well.

Fold the FQs in 2, and lay the straight edge of the template on the fold, pin and cut out 2 of the purse body, batting and lining fabrics.

P9267871

Step 2

Layer the batting and purse body fabrics so that the purse fabrics and right sides together and there is a batting piece on the outside (so batting = bread, and purse fabrics are sandwich filling) and pin together - making sure you start at the little dash on the template, and finish in the same point on the other side.

Using a generous 1/4" seam, sew the 2 pieces together in the direction of the arrows. Repeat with the lining fabrics.

P9267878

Step 3
Box the corners of both the purse body and the lining. You want to mark a point using a pencil or disappearing ink that is 2" across.

P9267879

Step 4
Place the lining into the purse body, wrong sides together. Poke the corners into each other, and match up the edges and pin well all around the edge.

pin

Step 5
Topstitch carefully all the way around the edge - lengthen your stitch a little and use the needle down position. Take this bit slowly, and pay extra attention to the sides as these will be visible when you're all finished.

glue

Step 6
Glue the purse body into the frame, one side at a time. Apply a thin bead of glue to one side of the purse body, and a thin bead of glue inside the channel of one side of the frame. If you are using HT2 glue leave it for a few minutes to become tacky. 5 minutes is a perfect length of time.

** NOTE: If you are using a different brand of glue check the user instructions first to see if you need a setting time, or not. **

poke

Once your glue is tacky (if you are using HT2) start inserting the purse body into the frame, start at the sides first, and work upwards and across to the middle top.

Use a pair of scissors or a skewer to really push the purse body into the frame. Be forceful and stuff the fabric right into that channel to make sure it sticks evenly. Work quite quickly so the glue doesn't completely dry. As you go make sure you have no puckers or uneven bits on both the lining side and outside of the purse.


Leave this side to dry for a good 10-20 minutes or so before you start on the other side and repeat step 6  just as did before.


Once you've glued you can make the bond extra strong by cutting 2 lengths of piping cord, each one 9" in length and poke it into the channel between the purse body and the frame using the scissors or skewer.

Now leave your purse to completely dry - don't be using it for a good hour!

AGF4

And that's it. Once you've made one purse I bet you will make a gazillion; they make really great gifts and this 6" x 3" size is a perfect size for make up, an evening bag, for holding all that junk you gather in the bottom of your handbag - like your keys, phone, lipstick and money.

Head on over to I'm A GingerMonkey for a chance to win a bundle of Rock and Romance for yourself! As usual - you must follow AGF on your favourite social media platform to be eligible to enter (whether that's facebook, twitter, flickr or the AGF blog)

AGF

And don't forget to add any projects you made from this (and the other fabulous Art Gallery Fat Quarter Gang tutes) to the flickr group!

Til next time.. Happy Sewing

<3,

Katy & The Fat Quarter Gang